38 Entries found searching ' for directories in Places to Visit - Page 1'
Abbeyleix
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The original town of Abbeyleix grew up near the River Nore, on the site of an early Christian abbey. The town developed under the protection of a twelfth century Cistercian monastery. In 1562, Queen Elizabeth granted the abbey and associated lands to Thomas, Earl of Ormond. Over the next century, the village grew to contain 52 families.
Full Information http://www.abbeyleixheritage.com/ + 353 578731653
info@abbeyleixheritage.com
Abbeyleix Library and Art  Gallery
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This beautifully refurbished public library includes an art gallery offering a great opportunity for artists, photographers and sculptors to showcase their work. Visitors are welcome.
Clonaslee
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This floral oasis in the Laois farmland was established 15 years ago. In the old farmyard, a sundial is surrounded by box hedging and flowers. A rambling red rose climbs the gable end of an old stone farm building. Near the house, a seated area is shaded by a pergola covered in wisteria. From here visitors can admire the rockeries, the raised lavender bed, the upright yews and the weeping copper beech.
Full Information http://www.clonasleegarden.com/ +353 (0) 57-8648038
annecostelloe@eircom.net
Clonbrock Heritage Museum
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Step in the past at the Clonbrock Heritage Museum. The collection, gathered over a number of years, contains an array of vintage objects associated with farming, mining and other trades. It provides a fascinating glimpse into how our forefathers lived and worked. The museum is ideal for all ages. For the older visitor, it’s a nostalgic peek into the past or stroll down memory lane. Younger visitors can explore their rich heritage, a fascinating educational experience awaits. An entrance fee applies. Tours and groups welcome. Please contact for further details.
Full Information http:// 087 691 3250 & 087 281 9157
clonbrockmuseum@hotmail.com
Daru na nÓg - Durrow
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The playground features spring seesaw, toddler multiway, spring rocker, sand pit, water play unit, bucket swing, spinning basket, standing seesaw, slides, cable runway, large swing rope, standing swing.
Donaghmore Workhouse and Agricultural Museum
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Donaghmore Famine Workhouse Museum is a unique attraction in Co. Laois, Ireland and aims to tell the story of the families who lived and died within the Famine Workhouse walls before, during and after the Great Famine. The Museum uses guided and self-guided tours combined with various exibits to explain the socio-economic conditions which led to the establishment of this and other Workhouses.
Full Information http://www.donaghmoremuseum.com/ +353 (0)86 8296685
info@donaghmoremuseum.com
Dunamaise Arts Centre
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Dunamaise Arts Centre is the premier location for theatre, film and exhibitions in the Midlands and hosts superb selection of theatre, music, dance, cinema, exhibitions and workshops over the season.
Full Information http://www.dunamaise.ie/ + 00353 57 866 3355
info@dunamaise.ie
Dunmore Country School
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Although this garden was only established in 2005, it has already featured in the Farmers Journal, Irish Times and Irish Independent as well as Jane Powers’ book The Living Garden. Dunmore Country School has also featured on RTE’s Nationwide and Dermot’s Secret Garden. It covers approximately 1 acre. It is not a show garden, rather a working kitchen garden, which is dedicated to teaching. It is, in the owner's (Tanguy de Toulgoët) words, “not a display garden but a garden in progress”.
Full Information http://www.dunmorecountryschool.ie/garden.html +353 (0) 87-1258002 / +353 (0) 57-8736578
Durrow Village
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The great oak forests that once covered ancient Ireland gave Durrow its name, which comes from Daurmagh Ua nDuach, or the Oak Plain of the people known as the Uí Duach. The Normans adapted that name to Durrow when they founded a borough on the Erkina River in the early 1200s. This small, self-governed settlement was so successful that in 1245, King Henry III granted Geoffrey de Turville, Bishop of Ossory, the right to hold a yearly fair in Durrow, as well as a market every Thursday.
Emo Court
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100 acres of parkland with formal lawns, mature trees and a nursery lake all located against the backdrop of a stately 18th century building.
Full Information http://www.opw.ie/en/ +353 (0) 57-8626573 / +353 (0) 86-8107916
emocourt@opw.ie
Emo Court
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Emo Court is a country villa designed by architect James Gandon (1743-1823), best known for his great public buildings, including the Custom House and the Four Courts in Dublin. The house is a magnificent example of the neo-Classical style, reflecting the architecture of ancient Greece and Rome. The house is surrounded by beautiful gardens and parkland which were first laid out in the 18th century and contain formal lawns, a lake and woodland walks with many very fine trees and shrubs.
Fruitlawn Garden
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Walled-in garden of approximately 1 acre with richly planted perennial borders containing many unusual plants, Hornbeam tunnel, orchard, fruit and vegetable garden, oak copse, yew hedges, beautiful climbing roses and many other lovely trees and shrubs.
Full Information http://www.arthurshackleton.com/ +353 (0) 57-8730146
shackletonarthur@yahoo.ie